Listed Buildings in Goldhanger Parish

 

Goldhanger House

Goldhanger House was the Rectory between 1851 and 1939. It is a classic Victorian rectory built on land that was previously Pumhouse Farm. The location is the highest point in the Parish and commands impressive views across the Blackwater Estuary. The original farmhouse was converted a coach house and stables for the rectory. The building was advertised for sale in 1939. Since the 1940s Goldhanger House has been a private residence and the coach house has been a separate private residence since the 1960s. The former or present buildings appear on all local maps since 1770.

Listed building records extract...

C1851 house. Ewan Christian for the Rev. C. Leigh. Red brick with blue brick diapering. Yorkshire stone dressing to plinths. All window dressings and cills of Caen stone. Specified diamond quarry glass lead lights, of British plate glass to dining and drawing rooms, thick crown glass to all other windows. Door and window cills of English oak. Baltic fir, deals and battens for joinery. Red plain tiled roofs. Stepped eaves cornice. Stone coping and finials to all gables. 6 red brick chimney stacks with various 3 octagonal, diagonal attached and square shafts, all with decorative mouldings and cappings, one to far right, front exterior. One red brick chimney stack to left single storey former service wing.

Asymmetric plan. 2 storeys attics and cellar. Main range with left and off centre right forward gables. Mainly 1:3:1 window range of 2 or 3 light moulded mullions and transoms, that to main staircase 3 long lights with centre transom. Two 2 light basement windows. Left gable attic with one light. Dressed vertical ventilator strip to right gable apex, the window below of 2 lights with Gothic heads under a square head. Entrance porch to right gable of moulded and sunk chamfered segmental pointed arch of Caen stone, internal steps approach the double vertically boarded doors with strap hinges and segmental pointed head. Lower panelling to leaded side lights. The left former service wing, now adapted as a garage with stone lintel over a vertically boarded door. Garage door to rear. Internal features include arcade of 2 segmental pointed arches to left of main Hall and leading to fine dog leg late Tudor style staircase with moulded pierced flat balusters, moulded hand rail, stop chamfered newels, moulded and pointed finials and pendants.

Windows throughout have panelled shutters. All doors panelled with panelled reveals. Moulded wainscots. Dog leg servants staircase with moulded handrail, stick balusters, pendants and finials to newels. Good fire surrounds, some of marble, 3 to bedrooms with cast iron surr- ounds, one with original tiles. Barrel vault ceilings to 2 bedrooms. Moulded cornices to main room ceilings, 2 of which have moulded friezes. Stone floor to old kitchen. Cellars comprise those for wine, meat, ale, laundry and dairy. All detail and materials of high quality as quoted in printed plans and specifications in present owner's possession. With the exception of the collapse of the conservatory (20 erected in its place), the butler's pantry now converted into a kitchen and the old service wing into a garage, the house remains intact. It was built at a cost of £1,900 plus £100 for various extras.

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Tayspills / Lavender Cottage - 6 Church Street

This cottage was originally called Lavender and that name appears in the plaster over the front door. However for a period in 1960s to 1990s owner and local historian Maura Benham called it Tayspills after her local ancestors. The 1820s Tithe map and Awards identifies the building as “two cottages” and they can be seen as a pair of cottages on early postcards of Church Street.

Listed building records extract...

C17/C18 cottage or earlier with later alterations. Timber framed and parget plastered. Red plain tiled double range roofs. Left red brick chimney stack. 3 window range of small paned vertically sliding sashes in moulded surrounds. To right is a 4 panelled door with a flat canopy on brackets. The name Lavender Cottage inscribed in the plaster above this door.

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Elms Bakery    31 Church Street

The 1820s Tithe map and Awards and the 1838 Tithe Awards identifies the building as a shoemakers shop. The history of the Cricketers Inn next door tell us that Caleb Chaplin was the baker who lived next door in the bakery in 1869. In the first half of the 1900s the lean-to extension to right was a fish and chip shop operated by the Emeny family who lived in this house and owned the Blacksmiths opposite.

Listed building records extract...

C18 cottage or earlier. Timber framed, C19 painted brick facing. Red plain tiled roof. Lean-to extension to right with red pantiled roof. Right red brick chimney stack. Dentilled eaves cornice. 2 storeys. 3 window range of small paned casements, central window blocked. Matching window to right extension. Vertically boarded door with segmental arch over.

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Hall Farmhouse

Hall Farm has existed for centuries and has had several names.  The 1820s Tithe map and Awards identifies the farm as “Joyces”. In a newspaper advert in the 1849 it was called the illusive Goldhanger Hall. It was called Street Farm in Kelly's Directories of 1892 & 1899. The farmhouse on early postcards of Church Street and has hardly changed in appearance since 1900.The farm went out of business in the 1990s and the house became a private residence.

Listed building records extract...

C16/C17 house or earlier with later alterations and additions. Timber framed and plastered with ashlar lines. Red plain tiled roof hipped and outshot to right. Off centre right red brick chimney stack. 2 storeys. One storey and attic rear left wing. 3 window range of small paned vertically sliding sashes in moulded surrounds. Pentice boards to ground floor windows. C20 vertically boarded door. Pediment on brackets. Rear left wing with gabled dormer and 2 small paned casement windows with small light between. Originally with crosswing to right.

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The Old Rectory

The Old Rectory has had many names and is identified on the 1820s Tithe map and Awards as the Parsonage House and Glebe and being next door to the Church was clearly the rectory for many centuries. On the 1870s map it is marked as “Parochial School - boys & girls”. (the village school wasn’t built until 1875). A Rector has not lived in the house for almost 200 years and as the farmer of church land lived there, it was known as Church Farm. The building was advertised for sale in 1832 and again in 1906. On an early 1900s postcard of the Old Rectory the large dormer window is not present and was probably added after a fire in 1922 resulted in some restoration work.  The out building in the grounds of the Old Rectory is also a listed building.

Listed building records extract...

C16/C17 house or earlier origin with later alterations and additions. Timber framed and plastered, some painted brick facing. Large hipped red tiled roof, full height central gabled dormer with C19 casements. Right and left red brick chimney stacks. 2 storeys and attics. Central band. 5 window range to first floor, 4 range to ground floor of small paned vertically sliding sashes, excepting first floor central window which is of 3 lights. Central gabled red tiled open porch on timber supports. Vertically boarded door with small paned top light. To the left are 2 attached single storey ranges, that to right with double vertically boarded doors and a recessed 4 panelled door. Sun Insurance plaque to left return. Chamfered bridging joists to rear range. Ogee moulding to C14/C15 bridging joist to right ground floor room, possibly not in situ.

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Outbuildings west of The Old Rectory

This building has had several names and uses over the centuries: carriage house, coach house and apple store. Its architecture has sufficient similarly to the adjacent rectory to presume that it is contemporary with it. There are signs of openings on the west side of it away from the rectory, which together with its long thin shape suggests that it was in part a cart lodge associated with the Tithe barn and farmyard that was once adjacent. In the early 1900s fruit farmer Charles Page used it and the Tithe barn to store apples and other soft fruits, hence one of its former names.

Listed building records extract...

Outbuilding probably a former stables and carriage house. C19. Painted brick. Hipped grey slate roof. A long, single storey range with dentilled eaves cornice and band. Double vertically boarded doors to left and 2 casement windows to right. Good group value with Church and Old Rectory.

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Church of St Peter

The Church is the only grade-1 listed building in village and the only one built of stone. Parts of the building are clearly over 1000 years old. However, in keeping with many other churches of this age, it has been modified and extended many times, most notable by the Revd. Leigh in the 1850s. A newspaper report recorded the occasion. local historian Maura Benham wrote extensively about the history of St. Peters in her book: Goldhanger - an Estuary Village which was published in 1977 and can be read online.   Extracts about the Church are also  included on this website at... St-Peters Church. There is also a short video about the St.Peters on YouTube..

Listed building records extract...

C11 chancel and nave. C14 south aisle rebuilt and probably also west tower and west end of church rebuilt. Late C15 south chapel. South porch in existence in 1780. C19 and C20 restorations, including rebuilding of south arcade and chancel arch. Built of flint rubble, septaria and puddingstone. Limestone, Roman tile and brick dressings. Red plain tiled roofs. Chancel and south chapel east walls each gabled and with angle buttresses. Roman brick and tiled north quoin. C19/C20 2 light window with 2 centred head to chancel. C12 round head window with jambs and arch of Roman brick to north wall. C19/C20 3 light window with segmental pointed head to east and south walls of south chapel.

Nave north wall has 2 C19/C20 2 light windows with tracery under square heads. C16 moulded labels representing the 4 winged beasts of the Revelation, the lion, the calf the human face and the flying eagle. Between these windows is a C12 window similar to that in chancel wall. East quoins of Roman brick and tile. A flint and rubble buttress adjacent to west. Two centred arch to north doorway, possibly C12 origin but much restored. Nailed vertically boarded door with ornate hinges. South aisle has a C19/C20 2 light window with 2 centred head and tracery to right and left of the C19 south porch.

The porch has stepped buttresses to south angles and moulded 2 centred arch with label and foliate stops. Full length stone bench on brackets to east wall; similar but broken seat to west wall. Moulded roof rafters. South doorway restored C14 with stop moulded jambs and 2 centred arch with moulded label. Nailed vertically boarded door with ornate straps and hinges. Probable C14 crenellated west tower, 10 feet square, of 3 stages, with 3 bands and buttresses to angles. Stair turret to north east wall with one slit light. West doorway with moulded jambs, 2 centred arch and label, nailed vertically boarded door with ornate hinges. West window of 2 cinquefoiled lights with tracery and label, this much worn. One small trefoiled light to second stage north, west and south faces. Each wall of the bell chamber has a window of 2 cinquefoil headed lights under a square head with label. Vertically boarded sounding louvres with trefoils. Diapered flint flushwork panel over west window and flint decoration above first stage band. Crenellated heads to rainwater pipes, some inscribed CBL 1853. Interior has ceiled 7 cant roof to chancel. C19 patterned coloured tile floor. Panelled and painted reredos. C15 4 centred arch of 2 moulded orders to south wall.

Piscina possibly C13 with chamfered jambs, 2 centred head and foliate drain. Carving, possibly C14, to west of arch of a man, angel and ivy leaves. South chapel has ceiled 7 cant roof with 2 stop chamfered tie beams. Panelled altar and reredos. C19/C20 altar rails. Piscina C15 with moulded jambs, ogee head, octagonal drain. Altar tomb c1531 to Thomas Heighaiu, Alys, Awdrie and Francis, his wives. Purbeck marble, sides of 4 sunk and cusped panels with carved spandrels and central shields, that to east halved. Top slab with moulded edge and brass figure of woman in pedimental head-dress. Indents of a man in armour, 2 other wives and 4 shields. Later brass insertion to Anthony Heyham 1540 and his wife Anne with 2 shields inserted in earlier indents, tomb either rebuilt or made up from another monument. Wood carving C20 "Hands" by H Crawshay Frost. Nave has C19/C20 south arcade of 3 bays, moulded capitals and bases, octagonal columns and 2 centred arches.

Roof of 1310-1350 of 3 bays with moulded wall plates, curved braces to stop chamfered tie beams resting on head corbels of C14 date. Traceried spandrels. Four armed crown posts. C19 octagonal carved pulpit with traceried circles to each panel. C19 stone octagonal font. Moulded bases and shafts. Foliate carvings between trefoiled heads. Two centred tower arch of 2 hollow chamfered orders, half round shafts with moulded capitals and bases. Stair turret doorway with a 2 centred head. Door in second stage possibly C15 of battens with strap hinges. RCHM 2. [Pevsner BOE Essex revised 1965 p188. Cecil A Hewett 'English Historic Carpentry' 1980 p149 and 310.]

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The Chequers - Public House

The Chequers is one of the oldest timber framed buildings in the village and would have originally had exposed beams on the exterior. It has been the subject of archeological analysis in the past and the results of that analysis are included in the description of the inn on this website at... The Chequers Inn and History of the building. The inn appears on many on early postcards of The Square.

Listed building records extract...

C16/C17 or earlier with later alterations and additions. Timber framed and plastered. Brick plinth. Red plain tiled roofs. Large plastered brick chimney stack to main range. External right red brick chimney stack to right gabled cross-wing. Two storeys. First floor has four window range, ground floor two range of mainly two- or three-light casements. Board door with small paned top light, moulded surround flat canopy on brackets. Single storey extension to left. This extension has two rear ranges, the left return adjoining the churchyard with a three window range of two small paned casements and a C19 three-light vertically sliding sash. Vertically boarded door to front.

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2 Head St

The house is named after clockmaker Jacob Mickelfield who lives and worked here in the late 1700s.  The Deeds of the building from 1767 are in the local archives, which also refer to the “Black Bull” alehouse which was part of the same property and was just around the corner where there is now a garage belonging to the property. It was originally two cottages with the one on the left being a shop and post office, which operated until the 1970s. The building appears in many old postcards of The Square.

Listed building records extract...

House. C17 or earlier origin with later additions and alterations. Timber framed. Painted brick facing. Hipped red plain tiled roof. Off centre right red brick chimney stack. Rear wing to right. 2 storeys. 3 window range of mainly small paned vertically sliding sashes, excepting that to ground floor left which is a C20 oriel with small paned casements. Segmental arches to right ground floor windows. C20 six panelled door with top light. Moulded flat canopy on brackets.

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6 Head St

Number 6 Head St is currently called The Pump House after the two ancient petrol pumps in its front garden wall. The house was previously called “Sunnyside”. For most of the 1900s the right hand end was an undertakers, wheelwrights, carpenters and cycle shop. The house was the home of the proprietors Charles Mann and his son Bernhard. There are several early 1900s photos of the building:  Earliest   1905ish  1950s. Between 2013 and 2016 it was a very popular tearooms called Salty Dogs. The two ancient petrol pumps were restored in 2018.

Listed building records extract...

C17/C18 house or earlier. Timber framed and rough rendered. Grey slate double range roof. Off centre red brick chimney stack. 2 storeys. 2 window range of vertically sliding sashes with glazing bars, moulded surrounds. Pentice boards over. Enclosed red plain tiled gabled porch with carved brackets. 4 panelled 2 light door. To the right is a forward gabled crosswing with grey slate and red pantiled roof, part plastered, part painted brick faced. One storey and attic. Long casement with glazing bars to apex, small paned ground floor window with canopy on a row of curved brackets, probably a former shop window. Included for group value.

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3, 5 & 7 Head St - The Limes

This is one of the oldest timber framed buildings in the village and was probably a farmhouse with the classic arrangement of two living areas and two front doors, the larger part for the farmer and family, the smaller part for his son or retired parents. When originally built it would have had exposed elm beams. These were later covered for protection for the elements and “batten decoration” added. Only a relatively recent photo exits from Maura Benham’s book. She refers to it being known as “Marriners” in the 1700s and “Crabtree House” in 1894. It seems the name was only changed to “The Limes” after that name was dropped from The Parsonage opposite in 1906. The Wesleyan Chapel set back on the right next door appears to have been built in the back garden of The Limes and remains part of the property.

Listed building records extract...

House, now 2 dwellings. C17 left range C16 or earlier crosswing to right, with C18 and later alterations and additions. Timber framed and plastered with batten decoration. The 2 crosswings to right with some painted brick facing. Red plain tiled roofs. Large square attached red brick chimney stack to main range, external red brick chimney stacks to left of main range and left of gabled crosswing. Of complex plan, the main left range with small forward gabled stair turret to right and 2 right gabled crosswings. 2 storeys and attics. 2:1:1:1 window range of small paned vertically sliding sashes, that to stair turret a 2 light bay. 6 panelled door with moulded surround and frieze to main range. 4 panelled door to left gabled crosswing. Interior of No. 3 with much re-used medieval timber. Stop chamfered bridging joists. Restored inglenook fireplace. Cambered sunk chamfered tie beam. 3 board door with moulded edgings, original ironmongery. Butterfly hinges and other ironmongery to other doors. Side purlin roof of re-used sooted timbers. Halved and bladed scarfs. Halved and bridled scarf to side girt of No. 5.

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Wesleyan Chapel

This very small Methodists chapel is in the classical late Georgian style and was built in the 1830s. A summary of its history is given at... Wesleyan Chapel and there are more details in a booklet written by Maura Benham that has been digitised at... The Story of the Chapel at Goldhanger.

Listed building records extract...

1839 dated chapel. Red brick. Grey slate roof with the gable to road frontage. Right and left vertically sliding sash windows with Gothic tracery in round heads. Central 6 panelled double doors. Plain pilasters with moulded capitals, bases and frieze. Flat porch over. Oval plaque to apex inscribed: Wesleyan Chapel October 1839.

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Apple Leaves 17 Head St

The 1820s Tithe map and Awards identifies the building (208) as “cottage and garden” An early 1900s photo shows the cottage in the background and directly at the roadside. A 1930s postcard showing the cottage on the left opposite the new Village Hall also sows that. So at some stage the road must have been straightened to give the cottage a small strip of land at the front. It has two wings to the rear, a timber framed one that appears on the early 1900s photo. The other extension is much more recent.

Listed building records extract...

C16 cottage or earlier with C18 and later alterations and C20 rear extension. Timber framed and rough rendered. Red plain tiled gambrel roof with 2 catslide dormers. Rear and right red brick chimney stacks. One storey and attics. 3 window range of small paned vertically sliding sashes with pentice boards over, small paned casements to attics. Much of the original frame visible internally with heavy studding, top plates and tie beams. There is a later timber framed extension to rear.

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2 Fish Street

Number 2 Fish Street was previously a shop and bakery which operated until the late 1960s. It was also one of several alehouses in the village. It had a wing at the back of the shop with the baker’s oven that was replaced with accommodation after the shop closed. In 2010 The shop was temporarily restored as part of a national Heritage Weekend in 2010.

4 Fish Street

Number 4 Fish Street is part of what was a row of cottages, is now called Melrose and has a date of 1750 above the door. It appears in the middle of this early postcard.

Listed building records extract...

3 cottages, now 2 dwellings. C17/C18 or earlier with later alterations and additions. Timber framed and plastered with zigzag and ashlar pargetting. Red brick facing to No. 2. Red plain tiled roofs of 3 levels with rear crosswing to No. 2. 3 red brick chimney stacks visible from road. No. 2. One storey and attics, 4 light shop window with central glazing bars, moulded surround and fascia over. To the right is a C20 glazed door in brick surround with tympanum and brick arch. The 2 left ranges are of 2 storeys. 4:2 window range of various small paned vertically sliding sashes, sashes with glazing bars and small paned casements. There is a C19 hipped red tiled bay with small paned glazing, probably a former shop window to No. 4. Central 4 panelled door to No. 4 with flat canopy on brackets, date 1750 inscribed above. An attractive range of buildings, situated at the corner of Fish Street and Head Street, an area known as The Square.

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The Mill House

The mill, mill-warehouse and mill-house are directly opposite the bakery, which would have been no coincidence. Mill house  originally had the classic arrangement of two living areas with two front doors, the larger part for the mill owner and family, the smaller part for his son or retired parents. This 1940s photo shows the smaller half with a separate front. It is now all one property and has had further extensions. The cluster of buildings appears on the 1820s Tithe map and Awards as “house and maltings”. The 1880 OS map identifies it as “Goldhanger Windmill (Corn)” The mill building has long since been lost but undoubtedly existed on the site behind the warehouse, which is now the Mill Cottages. 

Listed building records extract...

C15/C16 house or earlier with later alterations and additions. Timber framed and plastered. Double range red plain tiled roofs. 2 red brick chimney stacks. Gables to Fish Street. 2 storeys and attics. 3 window range of vertically sliding sashes and casements with glazing bars, central first floor C19 2 light casement window. Central panelled door with 2 lights. Hipped porch with ornamental cornice, Chamfered support posts. Internally much timber frame exposed with heavy cambered tie beams to ground floor. Good quality side purlin roof.

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10, 12 &14  Fish St - Beehive Cottages

The Beehive Cottages were originally a row of four cottages which included a sweet shop protruding forward towards the street. A cottage at the southern end was demolished long ago, it became a garden and is now a private parking area.

Listed building records extract...

3 cottages. C17/C18 or earlier with C19 brick facing. Forward gabled brick wing to No. 14. Timber framed red brick faced. Red plain tiled gambrel roof. 3 catslide dormers with central glazing bars to 2 light casements. Off centre left and right red brick chimney stacks. One storey and attics. 3 window range of small paned vertically sliding sashes. 2 vertically boarded doors to right. To left is a 3 panelled door with top light and slanting red tiled trellis porch. There is a flat headed 3 light bay to left gable. The latter was used as a Beehive earlier this century.

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21 & 21A Fish St

Now called “Wallnut Tree Cottage” the building was originally two, if not three cottages as it appears as such on an early postcard with apparently three front doors. The building appears on the 1820s Tithe map and Awards (170) as “Cottages and gardens”.

Listed building records extract...

House and right attached cottage. C18/C19. Painted brick. Red plain tiled roof. Left and right red brick chimney stacks. Dentilled eaves cornice. 2 storeys and attics. 3 window range of small paned vertically sliding sashes. Central C20 glazed door, slanting red tiled porch on brackets. Right attached cottage. Timber framed and plastered, red plain tiled gambrel roof with 2 light C19 casement window to catslide dormer. Vertically boarded double door. C19 lean-to extension at rear.

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Bound's Farmhouse

The farm is one of the few named local buildings on the 1770s Chapman & Andre map and on the 1820s Tithe map. The building was advertised for sale in 1886. The farm was purchased by Wilkin & Sons of Tiptree in the 1920s and Stanley Wilkin moved in and developed the farm for soft fruits, pigs and poultry. On Stanley’s death his son John took over the farm. Today the farm mainly produces strawberries.

Listed building records extract...

C16/C17 house or earlier origin. C18/C19 front range of red brick. Timber framed and plastered rear wings. Hipped red plain tiled roof. Left and right red brick chimney stacks. Moulded eaves cornice. 2 storeys. 3 window range of small paned vertically sliding sashes with segmental arches. Two S tie plates. Semi-circular steps aproach the 6 panelled door with side lights and lights over. Capitals and bases to columns supporting a flat canopy. Gabled rear wings.

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Follyfaunts Manor House

The Manor has had several names and appears as Faulkins Farm the 1770s Chapman & Andre map. It is described in The History and Antiquities of the County of Essex, written by Philip Morant in 1758. The Goldhanger related pages have been digitised and the Follyfaunts description is on page-3 in the... Morant extracts.  A summary of the Manor’s history is on this website at... Farms - Follyfaults.  A History of Follyfaunts House was written by Peter Bushell in 2002, giving both the history of the building and those who have lived there. A 9-page abridged version is held in the local archives. The building was advertised for sale in 1813, in 1906, in 1933, in 1962 and in 2006.

Listed building records extract...

C16/C17 house.or earlier with C18 front range and later alterations and additions. Timber framed. Gault brick facing to front range. Hipped red plain tiled roof. Right and left red brick chimney stacks. Stone coping to parapet. 2 storeys and attics. Three 2 storey recessed arches. Band at first floor window level. 3 window range of 3 light vertically sliding sashes with glazing bars, excepting one light central first floor window, moulded key stones to gauged arches. 5 steps approach the central 6 panelled door with cobweb light over. Moulded capitals and bases, open pediment with moulded soffit. Gambrel roof with gabled dormer to rear wing. Moulded open string stick staircase. Moulded ceiling cornices.

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Falcon / Falcons Hall

The Hall is probably one of the oldest buildings in the village. As it was also a farm a summary of its history is on this website at... Farms - Falcons.  Amongst the many feature of the farmhouse is a prominent and unusual bressumer beam, the only one known to be in the village. The farmhouse and farm was advertised for sale in 1891 ,  in 1925,  in 1955 and in 2015. In 1995 an Archaeological study of Falcons Hall undertaken and the report is in the local archives, and records that some of the building’s features are consistent with a date of the mid-1300s. The Hall was probably names after its original owner: John Ffalons or Ffawcon in 1346.

Listed building records extract...

House. Early C16 or earlier with later alterations and additions. Timber framed and plastered. Red plain tiled roofs. Red brick chimney stack. Central range with left and right gabled crosswings, the latter jettied and with original carved gable bressumer. 2 storeys and attics. 1:2:1 window range of 3 light vertically sliding sashes with pentice boards on carved brackets. Serrated bargeboards with carved brackets to gables. Central C19 enclosed red tiled porch, 3 lights to gable. Panelled double doors. Interior reputed to contain original window with moulded mullions, C16 doors with strap hinges, exposed ceiling beams, arched braces to tie beams, arched wall braces.

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Highams Manor House

As a working farm a summary of its history is on this website at... Farms - Highams. It is described in The History and Antiquities of the County of Essex, written by Philip Morant in 1758. The Goldhanger related pages have been digitised and the Highams Manor description is on page-5 in the... Morant extracts. The house and farm are named after the family that lived there in the 1400s centuries and their history is given in... The Higham Family of Highams Farm. The farmhouse and farm, together with adjacent Longwick farrm was advertised for sale in 1906.

Listed building records extract...

c.1400, extended late C16 and C19. Moat – Medieval, 1400 AD to 1539 AD

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Charity Farmhouse

Charity Farmhouse was the homestead for Scotts and Motts farm. The earliest reference found to Scotts and Motts are Deeds of 1571-1653 in the Essex Records Office (D/DHt T325/1). There are many more early references to the farm at... Farms - Scots & Motts. There are also references to the farm and properties in... Charities for the sick and poor. The farm is identified on the 1820s Tithe map and is listed in the Tithe Awards as 135 “homestead”. The building was advertised for sale in 1835.

Listed building records extract...

The house stands on the same site as a farmhouse named as Scotts and Motts on the tithe map (c.1841). Early deeds dating back to 1626 reveal that a ‘messuage with 4 crofts called Scotts, lands called Motts (ERO D/DHt 354/1) was being used as a ‘feoffment on trust’ (ERO D/P 30/25/65) for the poor of Witham (ERO D/P 30/25/81) by the Bridge Street Almshouse Charity, whose donor is unknown. The house and land seems to have been used up to at least 1803 and possibly later as in 1848 there is a mention of a farm at Goldhanger used for the endowment of 10 widows. There appears to have been a house on the same site until now (2007) but it is unclear whether this is the original house used by the charity.

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Cobbs Farmhouse

The farm is said to be named after William Cobb in 1222. In the 1700s Cobbs was the home of William Bentall inventor of the Goldhanger plough. To make the parts he developed a small foundry in the field opposite the farmhouse. When the business expanded he moved to Heybridge. There is about the history of the farm at... Farms - Cobbs.The farm is identified on the 1820s Tithe map.

Listed building records extract...

C17or earlier timber framed house, C18 facade.Timber framed and plastered. Red plain tiled gambrel roof. 3 flat head dormers. Large square attached shaft chimney stack to rear, right red brick chimney stack. 2 storeys and attics. 3 window range of 3 light vertically sliding sashes. Steps approach the central 2 panel 2 light door, moulded surround, flat canopy on brackets.

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Vaulty Manor House

The earliest known reference to “Fawlty Manor” is in 1538, however the earliest indication on a map is the 1838 Tithe map, where it is shown as “Jehus”. The history the Manor is on this website at... Farms - Vaulty. The manor is described in The History and Antiquities of the County of Essex, written by Philip Morant in 1758. The Goldhanger related pages have been digitised and the Vaulty Manor description is on page-3 in the... Morant extracts. Although it is well outside of the village on the road to Heybridge, Vaulty Manor has always been, and is still, within Goldhanger’s Parish boundary.

Listed building records extract...

C17, or earlier, timber framed house with rear dairy and bakehouse. Around 1855 much of the estate was being sold off. On the 3rd Ed. OS. (1924) a house named Vaulty Manor appears closer to Heybridge, north of the Goldhanger Road. The 17th century house must have either become the manor house or adopted the name of the manor at some point after c.1890 as it was previously known as Jehew’s or Jehu’s farmhouse on the Tithe map of c.1841 and possibly earlier.

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Brook Cottage

Although the cottage it is well outside of the village on the east side of Wash Lane close and to Chappel Farm it is within Goldhanger’s Parish boundary. It is just visible on the 1820s and 1830s Tithe maps and is listed in the associated Awards as 118 “Barn & yard” belonging to the Revd. Thomas Leigh and occupied by farmer John Boys.  It doesn’t appear on other early maps as it seems to be hidden within a wooded area, however it is on this 1895 map. The cottage is thatched with black weather boarded external walls. It is the only thatched building remaining in the Parish. The only other thatched buildings in the Parish in living memory were Rectory Cottage (rebuilt in the 1970s) and Thatch End (demolished in the the 1970s).

Listed building records extract...

C17/C18 timber framed and plastered thatched cottage. Left red brick chimney stack. Single storey. 3 window range of vertically sliding sashes with glazing bars. 4 panelled door. 3 bays. Original internal C18 vertically boarded doors and fittings.

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